Lockdown Day 152 – 26 Aug 2020 – Question

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I like the Moody Blues. They still make good Music.

I recently thought about questions, and that made me think of the Moody Blues song, Question. The YouTube link below.

“Question”

Why do we never get an answer
When we’re knocking at the door
With a thousand million questions
About hate and death and war?

’cause when we stop and look around us
There is nothing that we need.
In a world of persecution that is burning in its greed.

Why do we never get an answer
When we’re knocking at the door?
Because the truth is hard to swallow
That’s what the war of love is for.

It’s not the way that you say it
When you do those things to me.
It’s more the way that you mean it
When you tell me what will be.

And when you stop and think about it
You won’t believe it’s true.
That all the love you’ve been giving
Has all been meant for you.

I’m looking for someone to change my life.
I’m looking for a miracle in my life.
And if you could see what it’s done to me
To lose the love I knew
Could safely lead me through.

Between the silence of the mountains
And the crashing of the sea
There lies a land I once lived in
And she’s waiting there for me.

But in the grey of the morning
My mind becomes confused
Between the dead and the sleeping
And the road that I must choose.

I’m looking for someone to change my life.
I’m looking for a miracle in my life.
And if you could see what it’s done to me
To lose the love I knew
Could safely lead me to
The land that I once knew.
To learn as we grow old
The secrets of our souls.

It’s not the way that you say it
When you do those things to me.
It’s more the way you really mean it
When you tell me what will be.

Why do we never get an answer
When we’re knocking at the door
With a thousand million questions
About hate and death and war?

When we stop and look around us
There is nothing that we need.
In a world of persecution that is burning in its greed.

It started with my frustration with somebody repeating the same, unproductive, question over and over.

Basically there are four questions. How, What, When and Why.

As a youngster there was a series of books – The How, What and When Series. I still have some of them. “How Levers Work” is on my shelve and the knowledge in my head! When was about history, those I did not buy. How things work, What Things do and How they do it, that still fascinates me. Later in life, I discovered that it is important to know history. Not to fight with it, because that is a waste of time. Even if you could burn Rhodes a million times, it will not change history. But study what Rhodes did and how he did it and perhaps you will find parallels in the modern world? Perhaps you will think twice before accepting too many Chinese gifts, or am I seeing things? When I was 12 years old, When did not interest me. Now I know better.

Anyway, my thoughts were about questions. We had a laptop problem. How the problem developed is important – up to a point. “Why do we not have a key?” I do not know. It does not matter how many times you ask me “Why don’t you have a key?” the answer will always be the same. Yes, it is stupid. Yes, it is negligent. Yes, it is everything. But it is history. But we have wasted so much time going round and round and round. And the most important question is: “Can you fix it?”

It made me think of these questions – how, why, what, when. Can I just ignore any of these questions? The answer is a definite and resounding “NO!” But they must be used correctly and perhaps in the right sequence?

We need to think how we use these questions. Sometimes “How” refers to the past, sometimes to the future and sometimes to the present.

Listen to this: “What did you do? How did you do it? When did you do it? Why did you do it?” Will the answer be the same if I ask “When did you do it? How did you do it? Why did you do it? What did you do?” I doubt I will get the same answer.

How did it happen? refers to the past. It is important, because the development of the problem may suggest a solution. But dwelling in the past is very unproductive. “How are we going to fix it” – that is present and future.

It seems all these interrogatives can be used looking back or looking forward. “Why did you do it?” as opposed to “Why are you doing it like this?” Both are important to know. Both can lead to very productive discussions. But we cannot change history!

When (there it is again!) I was about 11 years old, I had an accident with my dad’s brand new bakkie. Despite the fact that I was very careful. The question is “how did it happen?” To this day I am very aware that if a vehicle drops into a hole it will move sideways and i have no control over that movement. Productive how. But dwelling on that event is unproductive. Today the question is “How do you prevent something similar?”

And the point is, we need to think about our questions. Why (there it is!) is it important to have the information that I am asking for? How will the information serve the purpose? What will I do with the information? When will I use the information? Or I am I just asking out of curiosity and because I am a gossip?

Edward de Bono wrote a book called Practical Thinking. He opened my mind to accept something that used to irritate (the hell out of) me. I could never handle it when somebody “stated the obvious.” Then De Bono investigates the levels of answers to a problem, opening with stating the obvious! His conclusion is that even stating the obvious, somebody gives some information. By saying “It fell,” the person is saying it did not drop, it was not thrown, it was not …


Unfortunately De Bono did not offer any help for my frustration when I have to repeat myself ad infinitum. De Bono does not offer any helpful suggestion when people start asking irrelevant questions. “I saw an accident today.”  “Was it a blue car or a red car?” The problem is, sometimes these irrelevant questions turn out to be very relevant!

I just cannot win! “I need a miracle in my life!”

(Oh, I forgot about where! Just imagine “where were you when the laptop did the update? Perhaps.)

 

 

 

 

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